quarkus-screenshot

How To Debug Your Java Quarkus Microservices With Netbeans

As part of the quick tips series, I will show how you can debug Quarkus microservices using Netbeans. This quick tips work for any Java applications running either through Maven or in standalone.

Here is the commands to debug your application when running through Maven. The default debug port is 5005.

./mvnw compile quarkus:dev -Dagentlib:jdwp=transport=dt_socket,server=y,suspend=n

Here is the command to debug your application when executing through the jar command.

# start application in debug: example
java -agentlib:jdwp=transport=dt_socket,server=y,suspend=n,address=9009 -jar <your-application.jar>

I hope this was helpful. Stay tune for more quick tips.

Hadoop Developer – WordCount tutorial using Maven and NetBeans 7.3RC2

I have adapted the WordCount tutorial to Maven based development as this probably the most popular way to develop in companies. I am not going to rewrite how the WordCount tutorial works but it aims to get you up-and-running with Hadoop development pretty quickly.

I used NetBeans 7.3RC2 because of its integration with Maven but feel free to use an IDE of your choice. I am also using Ubuntu 12.10 64Bit as a development enviroment. I installed the Hadoop debian distribution package.

Warning
When running your WordCount application, Hadoop might throw an out of memory exception, this is because the default settings are -Xmx100m. Apache website mentioned how to fix it but it’s not relevant if you install it using the Debian distribution. Here is a quick solution, open the /usr/bin/hadoop (changing this file has no effect and doesn’t fix the problem /etc/hadoop/hadoop-env.sh):

  1. set your JAVA to the actual JVM path that you want to use.
  2. set JAVA_HEAP_MAX to increase the available memory to the applications i.e. -Xmx3000m
Here are the steps to creating the WordCount tutorial in NetBeans:
  1. Create a new Maven based Java project
    • NetBeans will create an App.java class, you can rename it to WordCount or leave it as it doesn’t affect the outcome of the tutorial. I will refer to the main class as App.java.
  2. Add the Hadoop dependencies, they are available in Maven Central. I used the hadoop-core.1.1.1 for this tutorial.
  3. Important: Maven doesn’t package dependencies when building application unless you are working with a “war” project where it will create a lib folder. In order to make sure that our libraries are available to the our program when packaged, we need to add the maven-assembly-plugin to our pom.xml. We also declare a our “Main” class which will be used to execute the program.
  4. Open App.java (or whatever you have renamed it to) and write the following:

You can create your Hadoop “input” directory and mount it to be HDFS then execute the following:

$ hadoop dfs -ls input

$ hadoop dfs -cat input/file01 

$ hadoop jar WordCount.jar com.etapix.wordcount.App input output

This is assuming that you are running from your project home directory and that you have installed Hadoop using the Debian distribution or you can follow the rest of the tutorial from the Apache website

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Will Oracle really make NetBeans the BEST IDE for Java

Not yet!!! But according to their webcast they want to make NetBeans the best Java IDE. This is a statement not to be taken lightly. Oracle are now investing in three IDEs which are all established in different ways. JDeveloper is Oracle’s IDE of choice, I am currently using it in my current project as I am developing for Oracle WebCenter. Oracle is also a strategic developer and board member of the Eclipse foundation. I do not understand what exactly is a strategic developer but I know that JDeveloper is their strategic IDE. Now, introducing NetBeans, Oracle has inherited NetBeans as part of Sun acquisitions (and a ton of products and services). Until now, Oracle has never made any plug-ins for the NetBeans platform but now they promise to make it the best IDE for Java, how will they make that happen?

I am a NetBeans evangelist and as the rest of the community, it was good news to actually know where it stands in the “Oracle” vision. So Oracle will never drop JDeveloper therefore the real fight is between Eclipse and NetBeans (as it always has been). In the first step of making NetBeans the best IDE, Oracle shold immediately start porting all their Eclipse plug-ins to NetBeans. Eclipse has strength in its alliance which also includes IBM (fierce rival to Oracle). Something has to give and Eclipse will not never close shop because Oracle has left them which is not as worse as lack of investment in the NetBeans community. It would also be a foolish decision to give NetBeans to the Apache Foundation (no disrespect here but it seems that public funds do not grow on trees).

There is something funny about Oracle “choice” statement. Did anybody tried to develop for WebCenter using NetBeans or Eclipse? That’s a nightmare!!! There is no choice given, they literally forced us to use JDeveloper (Do you require any Oracle support?) in our company which is the largest in its field in Europe (I am avoiding to mention the company name but you should get it from my twitter stream).

Eclipse and NetBeans are direct competitors with Eclipse being the de facto IDE for Java, dropping Eclipse support would close doors to millions of developers and dropping NetBeans will disaster for many paying customers (Sun’s partners).  I am not sure what is going to happen in the NetBeans/ Eclipse and JDeveloper saga but something has to give.

Let me know what you think.

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JavaFX Composer RAD Tool – First Review

Just over a week ago, Sun announced a RAD tool for JavaFx built on the Matisse framework, I believe. I was very critical of JavaFx for its lack of tool for building UI and I think this is a step in the right direction. The tool was made available through the NetBeans Update Center on the 14/12/2009. OK, so I have installed the plugin and here are my views; not just on the tools but also on other stuff I think would benefit the JavaFx community:

When comparing something, it only makes sense when we use a benchmark; here my benchmark will be Adobe Flash Builder (formerly known as Flex Builder). Over the years, Adobe had made it easy for the designer to build impressive user interface with minimal coding. Sun, in the other hand, made it easier for developers to build application, yes I am aware of some nice UI in Java but they still do not compare to the eye candy of Flash/ Flex.

I am going to look at the tools; Flash Builder and JavaFx Composer plugin, from a developer perspective.

Components:
A key feature of RAD tools is the amount of components they make available to developers without having to write too many codes. I understand the plugin is at a “preview” stage, whatever that mean (alpha?), but there are alot of missing components; as an example, this release version was meant to be a “preview” of what to look forward to but I cannot drag a “combox” from the components palette into my form, no data grid, no chart, no menu bar, no date components and can’t even draw a rectangle which is possible but only through coding. I hope the JavaFx team add all the components available in JavaFx plugin to the Composer.

moz-screenshot-2NetBeans JavaFx UI Composer

moz-screenshot-4Adobe Flex/ Flash Builder

Round-trip code update
One thing I dislike with Java IDE’s (or most of them) is the inability to change the generated code without requiring you to write more code. The Adobe team actually made a good job in giving more freedom to the developer. In Flash Builder, you can design your UI through drag-n-drop but also customise it directly through the XML file (MXML). This feature was not available in NetBeans Matisse, I could be wrong, but and again Matisse was not really used in large project (no comments, thanks), at least not were I worked. Why all the fuss, you might ask? Try to create a simple interface and add a “rectangle” object to it which you will use as a toolbar and tell me how simple that was.

The coding style in JavaFx is very similar to Flex/ Flash ActionScript (so why the “V”oid instead of void, but that’s another issue) and very easy to learn. So far, I found it easier to actually code the canvas then using the Composer plugin. Another thing, when inspecting object properties; not all properties are available, for example: the gradient properties are not available, which will require you to write more lines of code.

UI Preview Panel
Again, a feature which Adobe Flex/ Flash builder excels at (I feel like I am starting to sound like an Adobe salesman) is the synchronize preview of codes. This is not a due to JavaFx Composer plugin but this seems as a bug as sometimes, you might have to restart the IDE in order for the UI Preview panel to start working again. Hopefully the introduction of the RAD (or not so much RAD) tool, will fix this issue.

Conclusion
You might feel that I was on a JavaFx bashing quest but this is not the case. JavaFx might not have a large components set (well what about all the SWING components available which you can use? You might not be able to “skin” them to your application look and feel but they still availabe to you) but I still think it has a good future. If you take a look at the screenshot below which was built with Adobe Flex, it took me less than five (5) minutes to build. Now time to synchronize your watches and tell me how fast it will take you to build the same interface using JavaFx Composer plugin. It will probably take me less than five (5) minutes if I was designing it with Matisse. My point is; a RAD tool is supposed to promote productivity and YES!!! I have realized this is a “PREVIEW” release but can you actually use it? I know I will still be coding JavaFx for the foreseable future and I would love it to succeed. If you are going to call a tool “a RAD tool for building Form-based JavaFx UI” then I suggest that you provide most of the form components.

Should JavaFx UI RAD tools be based on XML like Android and Adobe Flash Builder?

moz-screenshot-5

5 components I like to have on JavaFx

  1. Menu and tool bar (come on guys, this was there in previous release)
  2. Grids (even just a simple table will do. For now I use JTable)
  3. Date picker, Rich Text and Navigator components
  4. HTML panel (something that display HTML and can also be used as iFrames)
  5. Panels similar to JInternalFrame (this will be useful in portlet-like applications)

I know it’s not really 5 things but they will make a difference. Thanks for reading and tell me what you think about JavaFx and its UI Composer.

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Develop High Transaction Web Applications with Java MySQL & NetBeans

This entry is a brief tutorial on how to develop high transactional web application. I will be looking at how to develop a high transactional application while maintaining data integrityFor the purpose of keeping this entry simple, I will be using some RAD tools, the NetBeans IDE, to generate most of the code.

In order to follow the tutorial, you will need the following:

  1. NetBeans IDE 6.7+
  2. Java JDK 1.6+ (my version is 1.6.0_17)
  3. MySQL 5.1+
  4. MySQL Sakila database
  5. Apache Tomcat 6.x
  6. An understanding of JPA transactions and ReSTful web services

This is my definition of High Transaction Applications:

A high transaction application is one that can serve multiple simultaneous requests from clients and keep them secure from each other. The application has only two purposes: read or write data to/from a repository either JMS or DB. The transactions have to meet the ACID criteria in order to be deployed in the real world.

Ok, the above is my definition and you are free to redefine it. I am going to build a web application that will be an n-tier application:

  • Database back-end (MySQL)
  • Entity classes
  • ReSTful Web Services to allow other developers to integrate the application with theirs
  • A web based front-end

For the simplicity of the article, I will not implement any security such as user or application level security (authentication and database table privileges). This tutorial is mostly geared toward the newbies but I am sure that more advanced developers would benefit too.

Let’s get coding.

  1. Make sure that you have loaded the MySQL Sakila database into your MySQL database. You can download the Sakila database from the NetBeans plugin centre (see here).
  2. Create a new web application and name whatever you like. I have named mine “WebApplication”. I will now refer the application as WebApplication. Make sure to choose Tomcat as your deployment server
  3. Add the MySQL driver “mysql-connector-java-5.0.7-bin” to the WebApplication libraries. NetBeans will work and connect to the DB even without the driver but once you deploy your application to a server, the application will not be able to connect to the DB and throw a ClassNotFoundException com.mysql.jdbc.driver.
  4. We are going to develop the back-end first. NetBeans makes it very easy for us to create Entity classes from database. I would recommend newbies to learn how to manually create Entity classes and configure the persistence.xml file. This tutorial makes use of JPA but one should ignore the drawbacks of JPA/ ORM frameworks.
  5. Right click on the project name and choose Entity Classes from Database… On the next screen choose the “filmActor” table and click on the Add button. Make sure that “Include Related Tables” box is checked underneath the Selected Tables panel. The screenshot does not show the “filmActor” table as I have previously generated the Entity class but I am sure you get the idea.

  6. If you are required to create a Persistence Unit, click on the persistence button -> you can accept the default name -> choose your Persistence Library -> choose your database connection -> choose “None” for Table Generation Strategy -> click Finish
  7. After choosing the table to generate the Entity from click next -> fill Package name -> tick Generate Name Query… -> click Finish
  8.  

    NetBeans generates all the Entity classes based on the database table that you have chosen. The next thing that we want to do is generate a set of ReSTful web services from the generated Entity classes. Again, NetBeans facilitates the work for us (it is important that you also know how to create the classes manually or you will not know how to debug them if there is any problem in the future).

  9. Right click on the project name “WebApplication” -> RESTful Web Services from Entity Classes… -> Choose the Entity Classes that you would like to generate the WS for and click add or add all -> click next -> on the following screen, accept the default values and click Finish

  10. You can go ahead and test your ReSTFul Web Services by right clicking on the name of the application and click on Test RESTful Web Services

  11. The previous step will launch your web browser within which you can test your web services (click on the node on the left and see the queries on the right)

  12. Back in the NetBeans IDE; right click on the project name “WebApplication” -> click on JSF Pages from Entity Classes… (The JSF pages will not use the web services as there are packaged together with the Entity Classes. This will improve performances and still allow external applications to integrate). Choose the Entity Classes that you would like to generate the pages for -> click next. On the final screen, fill in the package name for the JPA Controller and JSF Classes -> click finish

    NetBeans will generate the necessary files to create a CRUD application with a user interface. I suggest that you familiarize yourself with the generated code.

  13. Expand the Configuration folder under your project name “WebApplication” and the web.xml file. At around line 38, change the content of the welcome-file-list to look as follow
    <welcome-file-list>
            <welcome-file>faces/welcomeJSF.jsp</welcome-file>
    </welcome-file-list>

    This will make the generate JSF page to be the landing page for the application when requested. Make sure that you do have a “welcomeJSF.jsp” file before making the change.

  14. Right click on the application name -> Run. The application should load in your web browser. Now go on, play around with the application. And why not create a client to send request to the web services? (not today)

You can load test your application by using Apache JMeter. It is easy to run and configure. If you want to take a look at how JPA implements the ACID features, browse to your controller classes. Here is a short introduction to JPA transaction.

Hope you enjoyed and if you need any clarification, just leave me a comment and try to get back to you ASAP (if time permits).

Develop Your Own Google with Apache Lucene (Java Nutch Solr)

Apache Lucene is Open Source API that allows a Java developer (.Net libraries available) to write indexing and full-text search capable applications. I have been writing applications based on Lucene for the last 3 years and some of the applications have been deployed at large corporations. I know there are other libraries available to developers who wish to write indexing engine but this blog will solely focus on Apache Lucene. I will not compare it to other API.

Lucene is a very mature API and can be found in NetBeans IDE, Liferay, JackRabbit among others. IBM has written a very good document about the Lucene architecture, therefore I will not delve into it here.

Lucene, alone, is pretty much useless as any other API. Let’s now introduce Nutch. Nutch is a web crawler built-on top of Lucene to provide file crawling capabilities. Nutch was designed to handle large amount of data from the internet (http). Due to its plugin architecture, it was later extended to provide local network crawling such as FTP, databases and Microsoft Windows Shares (I am the author of the protocol-smb plugin and co-author of the index-extra plugin found on the Nutch site). We had extended Nutch and turned it into an Enterprise Search application but most of the source codes were locked behind closed doors (company politics).Anyway, Nutch has evolved to become but still very complex in its inner working. The initial Nutch was developed to process data in a batch but there are ways to turn it real-time but that’s for another day. Ok, so Nutch is good for crawling and indexing of data but it does not handle search directly. There is a web application available with Nutch but it is quite poor so let’s now introduce the Solr.

Solr is a powerful web-based search server built-on top of Lucene. The application was developed by CNET Networks and donated to the Apache Foundation. I believe, not too sure so I might need some references here, Solr was powering the search feature on their site but it is definitely used internally by the company. Late 2009, Lucid Imaginations receives $7.5 million in funding to provide commercial services built around Solr (and Lucene possibly?). Here is a very good presentation about Solr. Solr is a very good indexing engine. The keyword here is “indexing engine”. It does not have any support for crawling data therefore requiring the developer to create applications that will feed it the data to index. I do believe that it is a good feature of the application as it gives the ability to integrate with various systems as long as they can post data over HTTP.

Nutch is a good crawler but it does not provide an enterprise-grade search interface to its data. Solr, in the other hand, is powerful indexer and has an enterprise grade search interface but it does not know how to gather data in its own. I am sure by now it has become obvious how we can integrate them both together.

We want Nutch to gather the data, by-pass its indexing cycle and feed the data directly to Solr. Lucid Imagination has a good tutorial about it here.

After reading the tutorial from Lucid Imagination, you will notice that Nutch is run by executing some bash files. This is something I strongly disagree with. If Nutch is based on Java (an OS independent language), why do we need to execute some UNIX/LINUX shell script. Also, the fact we need to install CygWin on MS Windows platform to be able to run is a big negative for me. I wrote a simple Java application that will launch Nutch and send the indexing to Solr but as you can see in the source code, you still need a UNIX like environment to run successfully. You can write a platform independent version by looking up Nutch API and calling the methods directly.

Well, I hope that this entry help you understand how to use Nutch and Solr built-on top of Apache Lucene. If you need any clarification, leave comments and I will try to gave ASAP if time permits.

package com.etapix.nutchsolr;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileFilter;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

/**
 *
 * @author Armel Nene
 */
public class Indexer {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        if (args.length < 3) {
            System.out.println("Usage:" +
                    "ncrawlName        -   This will be used to store crawler files in CrawlName directory" +
                    "nurlFolder        -   The path to the folder containing the URL to crawl" +
                    "nsolrUrl          -   The URL to the Solr server");
            return;
        }
        String crawlerName = args[0];
        String urlFolder = args[1];
        String solrUrl = args[2];
        String inject = "bash bin/nutch2.sh inject " + crawlerName + "/crawldb " + urlFolder;
        String generate = "bash bin/nutch2.sh generate " + crawlerName + "/crawldb " + crawlerName + "/segments -topN 10 -numFetchers 5";
        String export = crawlerName + "/segments/";

        String invertLinks = "bash bin/nutch2.sh invertlinks " + crawlerName + "/linkdb -dir " + crawlerName + "/segments";
        String indexSolr = "bash bin/nutch2.sh solrindex " + solrUrl + " " + crawlerName + "/crawldb " + crawlerName + "/linkdb " + crawlerName + "/segments/*";
        try {
            System.out.println("Injecting URLs in crawldb");
//            int state = 0;
            InputStream in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(inject).getInputStream();
            System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));


//            state = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(inject).waitFor();
//            System.out.println("process completed: " + state);

            for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
                System.out.println("Generating segments");
                in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(generate).getInputStream();
                System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));

                System.out.println("Setting environment variable $SEGMENT");
//            String segs = convertStreamToString(Runtime.getRuntime().exec("ls -tr " + crawlerName + "/segments|tail -1").getInputStream());

                String segments = export + lastFileModified(export).getName();
                System.out.println("$segments: " + segments);
//            in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(export + segs).getInputStream();
            System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));

                String fetch = "bash bin/nutch2.sh fetch " + segments + " -noParsing";
                String parse = "bash bin/nutch2.sh parse " + segments;
                String update = "bash bin/nutch2.sh updatedb " + crawlerName + "/crawldb " + segments + " -filter -normalize";

                System.out.println("fetch segments");
                in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(fetch).getInputStream();
                System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));

                System.out.println("Parse segments");
                in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(parse).getInputStream();
                System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));

                System.out.println("Update crawldb");
                in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(update).getInputStream();
                System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));
            }
            System.out.println("Inverting links");
            in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(invertLinks).getInputStream();
            System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));

            System.out.println("Indexing contents to Solr " + solrUrl);
            in = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(indexSolr).getInputStream();
            System.out.println(convertStreamToString(in));

        } catch (Exception ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Indexer.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }

    public static String convertStreamToString(InputStream is) {
        /*
         * To convert the InputStream to String we use the BufferedReader.readLine()
         * method. We iterate until the BufferedReader return null which means
         * there's no more data to read. Each line will appended to a StringBuilder
         * and returned as String.
         */
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(is));
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        String line = null;
        System.out.println("Now converting inputstream to text");
        try {
            while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
                sb.append(line + "n");
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            try {
                is.close();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Finish converting to text");
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static File lastFileModified(String dir) {
        File fl = new File(dir);
        File[] files = fl.listFiles(new FileFilter() {

            public boolean accept(File file) {
                return file.isDirectory();
            }
        });
        long lastMod = Long.MIN_VALUE;
        File choice = null;
        for (File file : files) {
            if (file.lastModified() > lastMod) {
                choice = file;
                lastMod = file.lastModified();
            }
        }
        return choice;
    }
}

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Java Interview: tips for the interviewer

This is a brief entry about how an interviewer should conduct a Java based interview. I have been on both side of the table and this is only based on my own observations.  I think most interviews that I attended in the past, and possibly some I have conducted myself, focus on the basic concept. I accept that developers should be aware of the language principles, but how can an interviewer test more advanced principles?

The interview time have to be split into: 

  1. Theoretical conceptsThis 1st phase is about asking the common questions about OOP concepts, differences between interfaces and abstract classes, differences between List and Set, multithreading and so on. If it is required to store answers, do provide a written paper and avoid multiple choice questions. In my experience, open-ended questions allow the developer to express his knowledge better. Multiple choice questions provide unnecessary hints to question answers. Even if I did forget a terminology or a definition by looking at the various answers provided, I can pick the right answer 9/10 times. Theories are central to practices but make sure can be related to the role you are recruiting for.An important point when interviewing a developer, if you have a developer present during the interview, avoid asking domain specific question unless it is something common. I had some interview with senior and lead developers asking questions about a programming problem they have recently encountered and were able to fix after spending months working on it, how am I supposed to know about that unless I have encountered the same issues in the past.
  2. Practical test
    In order to test a developer capability for the role, it is a must that he/she undertakes a practical test. You do not need to give the developer code with bugs for him/ her to fix, I believe this approach is not very useful. I would suggest that all interviewers prepare the developer to take a practical test using their favourite tools (provide two of the most common open source IDE) and provide them with a simple problem domain. In my experience, I had to write some simple factorial algorithm (a single recursive method) to a domain centric web service application (no DB, store data in memory instead) and to more advance concepts. If application multithreading is part of the main day to day job, then ask the developer to write a simple application that shows that.
    This practice exposes several features of the developer; from its reasoning by writing simple algorithm to coding practice (commenting and Java best practices) and problem solving.

After all, I believe that programming is more about logical reasoning and coding. The more senior we get in our profession, the harder it is to answer simple questions with straightforward answers; we get carried away and provide a complex answer to something so simple. We cannot talk baby talk anymore; our tongue is full of jargon. All developers should follow the KISS principle when answering theoretical questions but ultimately they should excel in the practical test. If they are good enough, they should use a text editor to write their codes and compile it through the shell (JVM command line).
Another thing that all interviewers should know; developers have very good memories and therefore can memorise more than 115 interview questions; I would recommend you to focus more on a practical test.

This was a brief entry for interviewers. The web is full of tips and questions for the interviewees and I do not see any point in duplicating them here.  As usual, this is based on my experience and belief, you are always welcome to comment. Also, support my blog by visiting my advertisers (by clicking on the link on the right) they might have something that you might need.

Top-10

10 Things all Java developers should know

Since Java (I know it’s not an acronym, but it stands out like that) was officially introduced in 1995, it has changed the way most of us look at the Operating System. Bill Gate (how ironic) once said that it was not about the hardware but the software which will be the future. A decade or more later, the fifth employee of SUN, John Gage said “The Network is the Computer”. Fast-forwarding to the 21st century and John seemed to be right. Anyway, Java was built not to depend on an Operating System and deployed through the network. Java through its applet technology gave birth to Rich Network Application aka Rich Internet Application (RIA). Java is not perfect; or we would not have various releases and more on the way, but Java has given birth to a wide range of programming language (just Google it to find out more).

Without further ado, I am going to get back to subject. This is a brief article on what I believe that every Java developers should know regardless of their experience. I do not personally believe that someone with 5 years experience is not as good as someone with 10 years experience. We all develop our own methods of working but as a developer you need to stay abreast of your technology. So, here are my top 10 not in order of importance (or?):

  1. Remember the basic of Java language and OOP paradigm.
    Most experience developers seem to forget the theory behind the language. I am not saying that they are not good at their job but can they explain to junior developers why they have used interfaces instead of abstract classes or why implement a pattern over another one? As a programmer, you become very arrogant as you believe that you write the best code but in the real world, people work in teams with different skill set and experiences. It is important that you can backup your actions/ codes. A very simple question such as; when should I use a String object instead of a StringBuilder/ StringBuffer? You might take this question lightly but can you actually tell someone else the difference?
  2. Know your technology stack
    All developers have to know their technology stack. What does it mean? Java is not like other languages; Java has subsets such J2ME and superset such as Java EE. We have our own area of expertise but it is important to know the differences between the various sets of Java. Some basic questions such as the differences between SWING, Applet, Servlets, EJBs and JavaFX will boost your confidence. Most developers do not know how to tweak the JVM and the differences between the JRE and the SDK environment. Do you know why you need the SDK to be installed to run Tomcat but you only need the JRE to run an application?
  3. Experiment with various Java EE framework
    I am not asking you to be an expert in every single Java EE framework but it will make the difference if you are familiar with Spring and EJB. That should actually be the de facto framework that should be on every developers CV. Developers should know the difference between Java EE 5 (soon 6) and Spring. Hibernate is also brilliant and it’s used for data access but all developers should have moved to JPA by now. Hibernate also comply with JPA therefore there is no more excuses.
  4. Know a scripting language
    Java can be heavyweight for some simple tasks which can be implemented using a simple dynamic language such as Python, Perl(?) and others. I would also recommend to developers to learn shell scripting on their target OS.
  5. Know how to develop web services
    The network is the computer, therefore it is important to know the different web services framework available. Data are integrated through web services and opening your services to the “cloud”. SWING developers will probably not develop web services but I am sure that they will be connecting to data through web services clients. Understanding the difference between the standardised SOAP and non-standardised ReST will help you choose which is best to implement your services.
  6. Know how and when to multithread your application
    I have to put that in there. Developers should know when and why to multithread an application, thread inter-communication and monitoring. All developers, junior or not, should know how to write a multi-threaded application.
  7. Database development using JDBC and JPA
    This should be a development law. All developers should know how to write SQL queries and how to create databases. All enterprise applications store data in some sort of relational database systems and it is therefore imperative that this knowledge should be of second nature. Java EE 5 introduced JPA (JDO was there before) but it is not applicable to all situation. Hence, knowing the difference and when to implement one instead of the other is important.
  8. Know a client side scripting language and what is AJAX
    The network is the computer and Internet is the deployment platform. Java EE and its various framework are server side executiong which can put extra “load” on the server. If you are looking to move a cloud based system where the providers charges you per resources used, it might be wise to move some of the execution to the client side. AJAX has been buzzing the scene for the last 3 years and more. This is not a technology but a new way of doing something that already existed. There are numerous Java AJAX framework such as GWT and DWR which makes it easy to develop AJAX based application which are compiled to JavaScript. Developers should also know what is the AJAX theories.
  9. Know your competitors and do not take part on “what is the best IDE” discussion
    Java is not the only language that can do what it does. I think that Java is more mature and complete as opposed to other languages. Knowing the difference between Java and .NET or Java and Ruby is a good asset to have. You also need to know when and why to use one instead of the other. Please please please, do not get into “my IDE is better than x because…” discussion as it is good for the Java community to have multiple IDEs and framework available to use. Every tools have their place as for example JDeveloper is better than x if you are going to solely develop on an Oracle stack and etc…
  10. Know ANT (MAVEN?), TOMCAT and any other mainstrean application server
    ANT is the de facto build script for Java and its IDE-based development. Maven is becoming popular and soon can be as popular as ANT (not sure of its popularity in the financial sector). TOMCAT  should be immortalised as the based servlet container that all developers should be familiar with.

There are alot more to add but this is just some of the basics that I think all developers should have in their repertoire. Feel free to add to this list in the comments box. If I could had another one to this, would be; all developers not just Java, should know how to search the web and Google is your best friends (now support my advertisers by clicking on the links on the right 😉 ). I hope you enjoyed the entry and feel free to comments good or bad!!! are welcome.

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ReST Web Services on Google App Engine using NetBeans 6.7

When Google announced early this year the availability of the Java language on their cloud system “App Engine”, this was turning point for Java on the web. The reason I am saying that is due to a simple questions; how many hosting providers support Java? And providing free hosting for that purpose… This was a good move in the direction of the JAVA community and the vast list of all the languages that run on the JVM.  But App Engine does not support the full range of the J2EE API. If you are looking to build any EJB, SOAP services or anything that access the file system, then the App Engine is not for you as it does not support it. To make matter worst, some URL connections are not supported by the Google cloud services. I am looking forward to the day when JBoss Seam will be supported entirely by their services without having to hack the code. Alright, it is not that bad; Google App engine supports a number of Java EE frameworks such as Spring.

Alright people, this was a long introduction but I believe it is worth it. You cannot create web services such as SOAP in the Google App Engine therefore, in this short article, I will show you how to develop a ReST based web services that works with the App Engine using NetBeans and Jersey API. Actually, NetBeans comes with Jersey support out the box. Now, let’s get started.
In order to follow the instructions, you will need the following:

NetBeans 6.7+

Google App Engine SDK

Google App Engine Plugin for NetBeans

I would expect you to know to be familiar with JAVA EE development and Google App Engine development. Once you have all the software and components installed, now we can start.

1.    Create a database structure to store your data. I used MySQL Workbench to design my DB structure (Google App Engine does not used MySQL and does not have plan to support it in the future). This schema is to help you understand the relationship between your entities. You can use any UML tools to design your objects’ relationship. There is a reason I chose to design DB in MySQL, the application generates SQL script which I will upload to MySQL DB. I will show you in the next step the main benefits.
 

2.    Based on your DB schema, create a database. You can use any database you want. I used MySQL to initially store my entities.

3.    Launch your NetBeans application and create new Web Application.
 

3.1    Choose Google App Engine as deployment server, click here to see how to register the App Engine in NetBeans.

4.    Now click on: File -> New File. In the popup window, choose Web Services in the Categories panel and RESTFul Web Services from Database and click next.
 

5.    Choose your the database that you want to generate your Entity classes from and click next. ( in the screenshot I am using the sample DB which came with the NetBeans and JAVA DB server. This is just for illustration purposes only as I have previously generated my Entity Classes from the DB schema I generated in step 1).

6.    Check your Class Names and how they relate to the database. Make any changes that you require in this screen, and then click next.
 

7.    In the next screen, just accept the default values and click finish.
 

Well we have done the hard parts. There is another step that missed out due to the fact that I already written the application. When generating Entities from Database, if you do not have a persistence unit available, it will ask to generate one. Here is more information on how to create a persistence unit with NetBeans. Make sure to make sure to choose “Create” as the table generation strategy.
 

By Now, you should be aware that we have create a back-end application store which we can call using normal http post, get, delete and create. NetBeans RestFull methods allows to use XML or JSON to send data to the services. The responses MIME can be anything you like as long as the application server supports it.
WARNING: JERSEY XML processing is not supported by Google App Engine as it uses JAXB. JAXB accesses API which is forbidden by the App Engine stack. If testing the application on the App engine, use the JSON MIME for your data.
Ok so we have generate the classes and methods require to expose our back-end to other application. As it is, this will not work on Google App Engine so we need to make a final change, this time we need to change the persistence.xml file manually. In the project window under the name of your project, click on Configuration files -> persistence.xml and open the file in the editor. Once the file is open in the editor, click on the XML tab and make the necessary changes to make it look like the screenshot.
 

Here is the content of persistence.xml; modify to reflect your entities and make sure the name of the provider is the same as mine and the properties are exactly the same.

    <?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″?>
    <persistence version=”1.0″ xmlns=”http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence” xmlns:xsi=”http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance” xsi:schemaLocation=”http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/persistence_1_0.xsd”>
        <persistence-unit name=”ReSTWebApplicationPU” transaction-type=”RESOURCE_LOCAL”>
            <provider>org.datanucleus.store.appengine.jpa.DatastorePersistenceProvider</provider>
            <class>com.test.api.Userlogs</class>
            <class>com.test.api.Customer</class>
            <class>com.test.api.User</class>
            <class>com.test.api.Business</class>
            <class>com.test.api.Reviews</class>
            <exclude-unlisted-classes>false</exclude-unlisted-classes>
            <properties>
                <property name=”datanucleus.NontransactionalRead” value=”true”/>
                <property name=”datanucleus.NontransactionalWrite” value=”true”/>
                <property name=”datanucleus.ConnectionURL” value=”appengine”/>
            </properties>
        </persistence-unit>
    </persistence>

Now we are ready to run the application and test it in our local environment. Right click your project name in the projects window and click Test RestFul web services, your favourite web browser with page that shows your resources. You can test your services by clicking on the nodes and or drilling through the nodes.
 

You can also use the Firefox RESTClient Plugin to test your app. Also, Google App Engine does not fully support JPA and might throw some exception about not supporting “integer type object for primary key”. If you do experience this issue, change the type of your key.
This is it for now, looking forward to your feedback, good or bad, they are all welcome. Also, if you need JAVA EE help, contact me directly. Also join me on facebook. Hope the guide or tutorial or whatever you call it, was good enough to help you with something.

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