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Web Services Architecture – When to Use SOAP vs REST

SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and REST (Representation State Transfer) are popular with developers working on system integration based projects. Software architects will design the application from various perspectives and also decides, based on various reasons, which approach to take to expose new API to third party applications. As a software architect, it is good practice to involve your development team lead during system architecture process.
This article, based on my experience, will discuss when to use SOAP or REST web services to expose your API to third party clients. 

Web Services Demystified

Web services are part of the Services Oriented Architecture. Web services are used as the model for process decomposition and assembly. I have been involved in discussion where there were some misconception between web services and web API.
The W3C defines a Web Service generally as:

 

A software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network.

 

Web API also known as Server-Side Web API is a programmatic interface to a defined request-response message system, typically expressed in JSON or XML, which is exposed via the web – most commonly by means of an HTTP-based web server. (extracted from Wikipedia)

Based on the above definition, one can insinuate when SOAP should be used instead of REST and vice-versa but it is not as simple as it looks. We can agree that Web Services are not the same as Web API. Accessing an image over the web is not calling a web service but retrieving a web resources using is Universal Resource Identifier. HTML has a well-defined standard approach to serving resources to clients and does not require the use of web service in order to fulfill their request.

 

Why Use REST over SOAP

Developers are passionate people. Let’s briefly analyze some of the reasons they mentioned when considering REST over SOAP:

 

REST is easier than SOAP

I’m not sure what developers refer to when they argue that REST is easier than SOAP. Based on my experience, depending on the requirement, developing REST services can quickly become very complex just as any other SOA projects. What is your service abstracting from the client? What is the level of security required? Is your service a long running asynchronous process? And many other requirements will increase the level of complexity. Testability: apparently it easier to test RESTFul web services than their SOAP counter parts. This is only partially true; for simple REST services, developers only have to point their browser to the service endpoints and a result would be returned in the response. But what happens once you need to add the HTTP headers and passing of tokens, parameters validation… This is still testable but chances are you will require a plugin for your browser in order to test those features. If a plugin is required then the ease of testing is exactly the same as using SOAPUI for testing SOAP based services.

 

RESTFul Web Services serves JSON that is faster to parse than XML

This so called “benefit” is related to consuming web services in a browser. RESTFul web services can also serve XML and any MIME type that you desire. This article is not focused on discussing JSON vs XML; and I wouldn’t write any separate article on the topic. JSON relates to JavaScript and as JS is very closed to the web, as in providing interaction on the web with HTML and CSS, most developers automatically assumes that it also linked to interacting with RESTFul web services. If you didn’t know before, I’m sure that you can guess that RESTFul web services are language agnostic.
Regarding the speed in processing the XML markup as opposed to JSON, a performance test conducted by David Lead, Lead Engineer at MarkLogic Inc, find out to be a myth.

 

REST is built for the Web

Well this is true according to Roy Fielding dissertation; after all he is credited with the creation of REST style architecture. REST, unlike SOAP, uses the underlying technology for transport and communication between clients and servers. The architecture style is optimized for the modern web architecture. The web has outgrown is initial requirements and this can be seen through HTML5 and web sockets standardization. The web has become a platform on its own right, maybe WebOS. Some applications will require server-side state saving such as financial applications to e-commerce.

 

Caching

When using REST over HTTP, it will utilize the features available in HTTP such as caching, security in terms of TLS and authentication. Architects know that dynamic resources should not be cached. Let’s discuss this with an example; we have a RESTFul web service to serve us some stock quotes when provided with a stock ticker. Stock quotes changes per milliseconds, if we make a request for BARC (Barclays Bank), there is a chance that the quote that we have receive a minute ago would be different in two minutes. This shows that we cannot always use the caching features implemented in the protocol. HTTP Caching be useful in client requests of static content but if the caching feature of HTTP is not enough for your requirements, then you should also evaluate SOAP as you will be building your own cache either way not relying on the protocol.

 

HTTP Verb Binding

HTTP verb binding is supposedly a feature worth discussing when comparing REST vs SOAP. Much of public facing API referred to as RESTFul are more REST-like and do not implement all HTTP verb in the manner they are supposed to. For example; when creating new resources, most developers use POST instead of PUT. Even deleting resources are sent through POST request instead of DELETE.
SOAP also defines a binding to the HTTP protocol. When binding to HTTP, all SOAP requests are sent through POST request.

 

Security

Security is never mentioned when discussing the benefits of REST over SOAP. Two simples security is provided on the HTTP protocol layer such as basic authentication and communication encryption through TLS. SOAP security is well standardized through WS-SECURITY. HTTP is not secured, as seen in the news all the time, therefore web services relying on the protocol needs to implement their own rigorous security. Security goes beyond simple authentication and confidentiality, and also includes authorization and integrity. When it comes to ease of implementation, I believe that SOAP is that at the forefront.

 

Conclusion

This was meant to be a short blog post but it seems we got to passionate about the subject.
I accept that there are many other factors to consider when choosing SOAP vs REST but I will over simplify it here. For machine-to-machine communications such as business processing with BPEL, transaction security and integrity, I suggest using SOAP. SOAP binding to HTTP is possible and XML parsing is not noticeably slower than JSON on the browser. For building public facing API, REST is not the undisputed champion. Consider the actual application requirements and evaluate the benefits. People would say that REST protocol agnostic and work on anything that has URI is beside the point. According to its creator, REST was conceived for the evolution of the web. Most so-called RESTFul web services available on the internet are more truly REST-like as they do not follow the principle of the architectural style. One good thing about working with REST is that application do not need a service contract a la SOAP (WSDL). WADL was never standardized and I do not believe that developers would implement it. I remember looking for Twitter WADL to integrate it.
I will leave you to make your own conclusion. There is so much I can write in a blog post. Feel free to leave any comments to keep the discussion going.

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Liferay and AngularJS Made Simple: Connecting AngularJS to a Backend with REST and JSON

Introduction

Liferay is the leading Open Source Enterprise Portal. One may asked what an enterprise portal is and this question is very valid as it has been asked on every single Liferay project that I have worked. This blog post is not about defining what an enterprise portal is but it wouldn’t be a crime if we provided a brief definition:

An enterprise portal is a web application which provides services required by an enterprise such as: user management, authentication and authorisation services, ability to connect to third party applications and provide a single point of access to multiple applications, hence the “portal”.

The above is my own definition and it could be extended to encompass web content management, content management system (CMS) and single sign on (SSO). This post is about Liferay and the use of its web content management system (WCMS) to create single page applications using AngularJS. The motivation to create portlets using AngularJS instead of Java is as:

  • Portlet development using Java is very expensive
  • Not many Java developers with portlet experience
  • Java portlets development requires heavy duty tools such as build tools, IDE and JVM
  • Portlet developers need to be familiar with the Portlet API, lifecycle and framework

We will focus on Liferay available RESTful web services API but do remember that you can create your own custom web services using Liferay service builder SDK.

Liferay RESTFul API and Security

Liferay ReSTFul and SOAP API implement the same security as the core library:

  • API can be secured so that only authenticated users can access them (AUTHENTICATION)
  • API can be secured so that only users with the right roles can executed certain API calls (AUTHORIZATION)

When creating your own custom API, Liferay Services Builder will create the necessary permission for the web services API.
For a list of API available in Liferay, point your browser to the following

http://<your-server-address>:<your-server-port>/api/jsonws

Liferay will provide a means of testing the services calls when the above URL is loaded. Most services execution will require authentication or a secured token to be passed on with the calls. This level of a security is required in an enterprise environment. It is possible to stop Liferay from checking for the secured token in portal-ext.properties as

Auth.token.check.enabled=false

Software developments should promote code reuse, therefore by separating the business logic from the portlet code, developers can share the business logic with third party applications.

Why Use AngularJS to Create Web Applications (Not Portlets)?

This is not a tutorial on AngularJS. Developers should use the same approach for developing any AngularJS application to developing Liferay web applications.
AngularJS is a popular JavaScript framework promoting Object Oriented Development (OOD) and Model View Controller (MVC) to the JavaScript community. Java developers are already custom with the methodology through the use of Spring MVC and JSF for front end developments. Developers familiar with Google Web toolkit (GWT) should find themselves in familiar territory. Now to answer the question of why use AngularJS to create web applications on Liferay?
AngularJS is JavaScript and therefore can be executed in the browser without recompilation and redeployment. Liferay Web Content Management System (WCMS) provides an HTML editor and content versioning. Liferay JSONWS API runs on the same server and can be accessed through the JavaScript written in the WCMS. AngularJS modules can be written in a third party editor such Notepad++ and uploaded to Liferay Content Management System (CMS). The Liferay CMS provides a link to the latest version of the file which can be referenced in the HTML/ JavaScript code. By creating the web services in Java through Liferay Services Builder, the java developer can focus on the business logic – including testing. The front end developer can utilise his skills in HTML and JavaScript to develop the user interfaces and any necessary interactions with the backend through the ReSTFul services. There is a clear separation of work and accountability. The learning curve for the Java developers to create the services will be minimal. To preview the live code, the frontend developer only has to save the content (WCMS) and refresh the page to see the latest changes.
Here is a quick example:

 

 <div ng-app="" ng-controller="companiesController">  
   <ul>  
    <li ng-repeat="x in data">{{'title: ' +x.title + ', group Id: ' + x.groupId }}</li>  
   </ul>  
 </div>  
 <script>  
   function companiesController($scope,$http) {  
    $http.post("http://localhost:8080/api/jsonws/assetentry/get-company-entries/company-id/10157/start/0/end/5?p_auth=cbSXanJ2")  
    .success(function(response) {$scope.data = response;});  
   }  
   companiesController.$inject = ['$scope', '$http'];  
 </script><script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.2.15/angular.min.js"></script>  

You can copy the above in a new web content article and see the result displayed on the page. Make sure to change red bold values to your system specific:

  • Company id: for ease of testing, you can retrieve that value from the control panel
  • P_auth: this value can be looked up programmatically as it will change every time the user logs into the portal

Traditionally, the simple code above would require a JavaServer page or JSF application which is slow for rapid prototyping. In software testing, portlets controller are one of the most complex components to test. By creating a clear separation between components, testers and automated tools can test each components individually. The sample code pulls information from Liferay REST web services and displays a list of registered companies on the page.

Conclusion

Liferay has a rich set of features which allows developers to create enterprise components and applications. When working with ReSTFul services, Liferay Web Content Management editor can act as an Integrated Development Environment in the browser. AngularJS is approaching maturity and it is very popular with web developers. Liferay 7 (next release as of writing ) will be introducing single page portlets but this is already possible with AngularJS and ReSTFul web services API. Needless to say that you can use any web browser to create content in Liferay CMS and debug your code in real time using tools such as Firebug.

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Happy New Year Techies!!!

I just wanted to say happy new year to the community, without you guys, we would still be living in the dark ages. Here are a few that I am looking forward to in the new year:

  1. Oracle Sun merger:- The untold future of NetBeans, MySQL, Swing and every open source that Sun has been working on in the past. What would happen to Sun Open Source (SOS!!!) Movement.
  2. Looking forward to JavaFX1.3 release, Authoring tool and improved Composer plugin.
  3. Android uprise against iPhone (not because I can easily write Android based application) and hopefully with Visual XML builder to build Android UI. JavaFX running on Android, anybody????
  4.  Looking forward to seeing real-world JavaFX application and possibly a showcase linked to the JavaFX.com site.
  5. Java EE 6 support in Google App Engine
  6. Google Wave open to the public and how well it does against Twitter and Facebook
  7. Java Store open to Europe (well this is where I am based and want to sell applications not just provide free).
  8. My new video blog ( well that’s me trying to be more Armel 2.0 – the sequel) to better engage with the community.
  9. looking forward to networking with fellow developers and techies.
  10. looking forward to the new buzzwords (old technology, new name)

Well, 2009 is was good year for Java and tech scene. I hope that you all enjoyed the year as much as I did. Why not share what wish list with me (comment box). Subscribe to follow my blog as I will try to bring more interesting articles in the new year.

Happy 2010 New Year, wish you all; success, properity, fame (yup) and fortune. Don’t forget, if you need a server-side, UI, Android or JavaFx developer, just mail me.

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JavaFX Composer RAD Tool – First Review

Just over a week ago, Sun announced a RAD tool for JavaFx built on the Matisse framework, I believe. I was very critical of JavaFx for its lack of tool for building UI and I think this is a step in the right direction. The tool was made available through the NetBeans Update Center on the 14/12/2009. OK, so I have installed the plugin and here are my views; not just on the tools but also on other stuff I think would benefit the JavaFx community:

When comparing something, it only makes sense when we use a benchmark; here my benchmark will be Adobe Flash Builder (formerly known as Flex Builder). Over the years, Adobe had made it easy for the designer to build impressive user interface with minimal coding. Sun, in the other hand, made it easier for developers to build application, yes I am aware of some nice UI in Java but they still do not compare to the eye candy of Flash/ Flex.

I am going to look at the tools; Flash Builder and JavaFx Composer plugin, from a developer perspective.

Components:
A key feature of RAD tools is the amount of components they make available to developers without having to write too many codes. I understand the plugin is at a “preview” stage, whatever that mean (alpha?), but there are alot of missing components; as an example, this release version was meant to be a “preview” of what to look forward to but I cannot drag a “combox” from the components palette into my form, no data grid, no chart, no menu bar, no date components and can’t even draw a rectangle which is possible but only through coding. I hope the JavaFx team add all the components available in JavaFx plugin to the Composer.

moz-screenshot-2NetBeans JavaFx UI Composer

moz-screenshot-4Adobe Flex/ Flash Builder

Round-trip code update
One thing I dislike with Java IDE’s (or most of them) is the inability to change the generated code without requiring you to write more code. The Adobe team actually made a good job in giving more freedom to the developer. In Flash Builder, you can design your UI through drag-n-drop but also customise it directly through the XML file (MXML). This feature was not available in NetBeans Matisse, I could be wrong, but and again Matisse was not really used in large project (no comments, thanks), at least not were I worked. Why all the fuss, you might ask? Try to create a simple interface and add a “rectangle” object to it which you will use as a toolbar and tell me how simple that was.

The coding style in JavaFx is very similar to Flex/ Flash ActionScript (so why the “V”oid instead of void, but that’s another issue) and very easy to learn. So far, I found it easier to actually code the canvas then using the Composer plugin. Another thing, when inspecting object properties; not all properties are available, for example: the gradient properties are not available, which will require you to write more lines of code.

UI Preview Panel
Again, a feature which Adobe Flex/ Flash builder excels at (I feel like I am starting to sound like an Adobe salesman) is the synchronize preview of codes. This is not a due to JavaFx Composer plugin but this seems as a bug as sometimes, you might have to restart the IDE in order for the UI Preview panel to start working again. Hopefully the introduction of the RAD (or not so much RAD) tool, will fix this issue.

Conclusion
You might feel that I was on a JavaFx bashing quest but this is not the case. JavaFx might not have a large components set (well what about all the SWING components available which you can use? You might not be able to “skin” them to your application look and feel but they still availabe to you) but I still think it has a good future. If you take a look at the screenshot below which was built with Adobe Flex, it took me less than five (5) minutes to build. Now time to synchronize your watches and tell me how fast it will take you to build the same interface using JavaFx Composer plugin. It will probably take me less than five (5) minutes if I was designing it with Matisse. My point is; a RAD tool is supposed to promote productivity and YES!!! I have realized this is a “PREVIEW” release but can you actually use it? I know I will still be coding JavaFx for the foreseable future and I would love it to succeed. If you are going to call a tool “a RAD tool for building Form-based JavaFx UI” then I suggest that you provide most of the form components.

Should JavaFx UI RAD tools be based on XML like Android and Adobe Flash Builder?

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5 components I like to have on JavaFx

  1. Menu and tool bar (come on guys, this was there in previous release)
  2. Grids (even just a simple table will do. For now I use JTable)
  3. Date picker, Rich Text and Navigator components
  4. HTML panel (something that display HTML and can also be used as iFrames)
  5. Panels similar to JInternalFrame (this will be useful in portlet-like applications)

I know it’s not really 5 things but they will make a difference. Thanks for reading and tell me what you think about JavaFx and its UI Composer.

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GWT Visualization Example – Annotated Time Line Chart Tutorial

If you are a server-side Java developer such as myself, I am sure you want an easy way to create AJAX based application but pure JavaScript (ECMAScript) is not your strong skills. The beauty of JavaScript is that it runs on any web server, no need for a servlet container or anything of that sort.

So, I have been writing AJAX based UI using the GWT framework for the past year and half. I am still not a web developer but I understand enough CSS to spice up my site. Anyway, I am writing this tutorial because I think that the GWT Visualization team, even tough they did a good job, over complicates the creation of charts in their tutorial. I was trying to create an Annotated Time Line chart so I looked up my previous code I wrote for the GWT Portlet JSR-168, see here. I also decided to run a search (don’t be evil, Google is your friend) to try to find different examples and hopefully some nice custom charts. First of all, based on the search result; I thought that some of examples, including Google’s own, were confusing and over complex. Most examples uses AJAXLoader to load the Visualization API, but you shouldn’t have to use this. This is the simplest way to create a GWT Annotated Time Line Chart.

gwt annotated time line chart

1. Using your favorite development tool with support for GWT framework, create a new Java web application, you can export the compiled JavaScript later to a non-based web application, if you use an IDEW you should code-completion support.

2. Make you sure you have included the GWT Visualization API module in your classpath.

3. In your project source code root directory, you should <AppNamexxxx>.gwt.xml file. make sure to add teh following line to it in order to make the  module available to your application.

<inherits name=”com.google.gwt.visualization.Visualization”/>

4. In order to keep this tutorial short and straight to point, I have included the chart creation code in my <AppNamexxxx>EntryPoint.java class

public class MainEntryPoint implements EntryPoint
{
    
    
    /**
    * Creates a new instance of MainEntryPoint
    */
    public MainEntryPoint()
    {
        
        
    }
    
    
    
    /**
    * The entry point method, called automatically by loading a module
    * that declares an implementing class as an entry-point
    */
    public void onModuleLoad()
    {
        
        Runnable onLoadCallback = new Runnable()
        {
            
            
            public void run()
            {
                
                DataTable data = createHistoryTable(result);
                AnnotatedTimeLine.Options options = AnnotatedTimeLine.Options.create();
                options.setDisplayAnnotations(true);
                options.setDisplayZoomButtons(true);
                options.setScaleType(AnnotatedTimeLine.ScaleType.ALLFIXED);
                options.setLegendPosition(AnnotatedTimeLine.AnnotatedLegendPosition.SAME_ROW);
                AnnotatedTimeLine atl = new AnnotatedTimeLine(data, options, “600px”, “200px”);
                RootPanel.get().add(atl);
                
            }
            
            
            
        }      
        ;
        VisualizationUtils.loadVisualizationApi(onLoadCallback, AnnotatedTimeLine.PACKAGE);
        
    }
    
    
    
    // This method will create the Data used by the chart
    private DataTable createHistoryTable()
    {
        
        DataTable data = DataTable.create();
        data.addColumn(AbstractDataTable.ColumnType.DATE, “Date”);
        data.addColumn(AbstractDataTable.ColumnType.NUMBER, “Price”);
        data.addColumn(AbstractDataTable.ColumnType.NUMBER, “Low”);
        data.addColumn(AbstractDataTable.ColumnType.NUMBER, “High”);
        data.addRows(5);
                  
            DateTimeFormat dtf = DateTimeFormat.getFormat(“yyyy-MM-dd”);
            data.setValue(0, 0, dtf.parse(“2009-11-21”));
            data.setValue(0, 1, 100);
            data.setValue(0, 2, 120);
            data.setValue(0, 3, 90);

            data.setValue(1, 0, dtf.parse(“2009-11-22”));
            data.setValue(1, 1, 90);
            data.setValue(1, 2, 110);
            data.setValue(1, 3, 100);

            data.setValue(2, 0, dtf.parse(“2009-11-23”));
            data.setValue(2, 1, 100);
            data.setValue(2, 2, 180);
            data.setValue(2, 3, 80);

            data.setValue(3, 0, dtf.parse(“2009-11-20”));
            data.setValue(3, 1, 130);
            data.setValue(3, 2, 100);
            data.setValue(3, 3, 130);
          

            data.setValue(4, 0, dtf.parse(“2009-11-19”));
            data.setValue(4, 1, 130);
            data.setValue(4, 2, 170);
            data.setValue(4, 3, 150);
            
        }
        return data;  
    }  
}

Don’t forget to import all the necessary classes and voila!

I hope this will save you some time in creating your charts.

 

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Develop High Transaction Web Applications with Java MySQL & NetBeans

This entry is a brief tutorial on how to develop high transactional web application. I will be looking at how to develop a high transactional application while maintaining data integrityFor the purpose of keeping this entry simple, I will be using some RAD tools, the NetBeans IDE, to generate most of the code.

In order to follow the tutorial, you will need the following:

  1. NetBeans IDE 6.7+
  2. Java JDK 1.6+ (my version is 1.6.0_17)
  3. MySQL 5.1+
  4. MySQL Sakila database
  5. Apache Tomcat 6.x
  6. An understanding of JPA transactions and ReSTful web services

This is my definition of High Transaction Applications:

A high transaction application is one that can serve multiple simultaneous requests from clients and keep them secure from each other. The application has only two purposes: read or write data to/from a repository either JMS or DB. The transactions have to meet the ACID criteria in order to be deployed in the real world.

Ok, the above is my definition and you are free to redefine it. I am going to build a web application that will be an n-tier application:

  • Database back-end (MySQL)
  • Entity classes
  • ReSTful Web Services to allow other developers to integrate the application with theirs
  • A web based front-end

For the simplicity of the article, I will not implement any security such as user or application level security (authentication and database table privileges). This tutorial is mostly geared toward the newbies but I am sure that more advanced developers would benefit too.

Let’s get coding.

  1. Make sure that you have loaded the MySQL Sakila database into your MySQL database. You can download the Sakila database from the NetBeans plugin centre (see here).
  2. Create a new web application and name whatever you like. I have named mine “WebApplication”. I will now refer the application as WebApplication. Make sure to choose Tomcat as your deployment server
  3. Add the MySQL driver “mysql-connector-java-5.0.7-bin” to the WebApplication libraries. NetBeans will work and connect to the DB even without the driver but once you deploy your application to a server, the application will not be able to connect to the DB and throw a ClassNotFoundException com.mysql.jdbc.driver.
  4. We are going to develop the back-end first. NetBeans makes it very easy for us to create Entity classes from database. I would recommend newbies to learn how to manually create Entity classes and configure the persistence.xml file. This tutorial makes use of JPA but one should ignore the drawbacks of JPA/ ORM frameworks.
  5. Right click on the project name and choose Entity Classes from Database… On the next screen choose the “filmActor” table and click on the Add button. Make sure that “Include Related Tables” box is checked underneath the Selected Tables panel. The screenshot does not show the “filmActor” table as I have previously generated the Entity class but I am sure you get the idea.

  6. If you are required to create a Persistence Unit, click on the persistence button -> you can accept the default name -> choose your Persistence Library -> choose your database connection -> choose “None” for Table Generation Strategy -> click Finish
  7. After choosing the table to generate the Entity from click next -> fill Package name -> tick Generate Name Query… -> click Finish
  8.  

    NetBeans generates all the Entity classes based on the database table that you have chosen. The next thing that we want to do is generate a set of ReSTful web services from the generated Entity classes. Again, NetBeans facilitates the work for us (it is important that you also know how to create the classes manually or you will not know how to debug them if there is any problem in the future).

  9. Right click on the project name “WebApplication” -> RESTful Web Services from Entity Classes… -> Choose the Entity Classes that you would like to generate the WS for and click add or add all -> click next -> on the following screen, accept the default values and click Finish

  10. You can go ahead and test your ReSTFul Web Services by right clicking on the name of the application and click on Test RESTful Web Services

  11. The previous step will launch your web browser within which you can test your web services (click on the node on the left and see the queries on the right)

  12. Back in the NetBeans IDE; right click on the project name “WebApplication” -> click on JSF Pages from Entity Classes… (The JSF pages will not use the web services as there are packaged together with the Entity Classes. This will improve performances and still allow external applications to integrate). Choose the Entity Classes that you would like to generate the pages for -> click next. On the final screen, fill in the package name for the JPA Controller and JSF Classes -> click finish

    NetBeans will generate the necessary files to create a CRUD application with a user interface. I suggest that you familiarize yourself with the generated code.

  13. Expand the Configuration folder under your project name “WebApplication” and the web.xml file. At around line 38, change the content of the welcome-file-list to look as follow
    <welcome-file-list>
            <welcome-file>faces/welcomeJSF.jsp</welcome-file>
    </welcome-file-list>

    This will make the generate JSF page to be the landing page for the application when requested. Make sure that you do have a “welcomeJSF.jsp” file before making the change.

  14. Right click on the application name -> Run. The application should load in your web browser. Now go on, play around with the application. And why not create a client to send request to the web services? (not today)

You can load test your application by using Apache JMeter. It is easy to run and configure. If you want to take a look at how JPA implements the ACID features, browse to your controller classes. Here is a short introduction to JPA transaction.

Hope you enjoyed and if you need any clarification, just leave me a comment and try to get back to you ASAP (if time permits).

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Java Interview: tips for the interviewer

This is a brief entry about how an interviewer should conduct a Java based interview. I have been on both side of the table and this is only based on my own observations.  I think most interviews that I attended in the past, and possibly some I have conducted myself, focus on the basic concept. I accept that developers should be aware of the language principles, but how can an interviewer test more advanced principles?

The interview time have to be split into: 

  1. Theoretical conceptsThis 1st phase is about asking the common questions about OOP concepts, differences between interfaces and abstract classes, differences between List and Set, multithreading and so on. If it is required to store answers, do provide a written paper and avoid multiple choice questions. In my experience, open-ended questions allow the developer to express his knowledge better. Multiple choice questions provide unnecessary hints to question answers. Even if I did forget a terminology or a definition by looking at the various answers provided, I can pick the right answer 9/10 times. Theories are central to practices but make sure can be related to the role you are recruiting for.An important point when interviewing a developer, if you have a developer present during the interview, avoid asking domain specific question unless it is something common. I had some interview with senior and lead developers asking questions about a programming problem they have recently encountered and were able to fix after spending months working on it, how am I supposed to know about that unless I have encountered the same issues in the past.
  2. Practical test
    In order to test a developer capability for the role, it is a must that he/she undertakes a practical test. You do not need to give the developer code with bugs for him/ her to fix, I believe this approach is not very useful. I would suggest that all interviewers prepare the developer to take a practical test using their favourite tools (provide two of the most common open source IDE) and provide them with a simple problem domain. In my experience, I had to write some simple factorial algorithm (a single recursive method) to a domain centric web service application (no DB, store data in memory instead) and to more advance concepts. If application multithreading is part of the main day to day job, then ask the developer to write a simple application that shows that.
    This practice exposes several features of the developer; from its reasoning by writing simple algorithm to coding practice (commenting and Java best practices) and problem solving.

After all, I believe that programming is more about logical reasoning and coding. The more senior we get in our profession, the harder it is to answer simple questions with straightforward answers; we get carried away and provide a complex answer to something so simple. We cannot talk baby talk anymore; our tongue is full of jargon. All developers should follow the KISS principle when answering theoretical questions but ultimately they should excel in the practical test. If they are good enough, they should use a text editor to write their codes and compile it through the shell (JVM command line).
Another thing that all interviewers should know; developers have very good memories and therefore can memorise more than 115 interview questions; I would recommend you to focus more on a practical test.

This was a brief entry for interviewers. The web is full of tips and questions for the interviewees and I do not see any point in duplicating them here.  As usual, this is based on my experience and belief, you are always welcome to comment. Also, support my blog by visiting my advertisers (by clicking on the link on the right) they might have something that you might need.